‘Miracle on Voodoo Mountain’ Book Tells Remarkable Story of One Woman Who Pushed Back the Darkness for Haiti’s Children

(PHOTO: THOMAS NELSON) Megan Boudreaux, founder of the nonprofit Respire Haiti, shares her story in the book "Miracle on Voodoo Mountain: A Young Woman's Remarkable Story of Pushing Back the Darkness for the Children of Haiti."
(PHOTO: THOMAS NELSON)
Megan Boudreaux, founder of the nonprofit Respire Haiti, shares her story in the book “Miracle on Voodoo Mountain: A Young Woman’s Remarkable Story of Pushing Back the Darkness for the Children of Haiti.”

Megan Boudreaux had visited Haiti before on short-term business and missions trips, but never did she imagine that God would call her to permanently abandon a comfortable life in the U.S. for a bare-bones one in a third-world country plagued by poverty and child slavery and that was just starting to climb its way out of a devastating earthquake.

Boudreaux visited Haiti in 2010, at the age of 24, at the behest of her employer. It was her second visit to the Caribbean island that just months prior had been rocked by a 7.0 magnitude earthquake.

The earthquake struck Jan. 12, killing anywhere from 230,000-316,000 people, according to CNN. More than a million residents were displaced, with tens of thousands more remaining in that situation today. In addition, nearly 25 percent of Haiti’s schools were destroyed or damaged by the quake, the epicenter of which was just 15 miles from the capital Port-au-Prince.

As Boudreaux shares in her powerful book, Miracle on Voodoo Mountain: A Young Woman’s Remarkable Story of Pushing Back the Darkness for the Children of Haiti, she was forever impacted by the “devastation and despair” she encountered on that trip.

The-then Louisiana resident found herself for the first time in the town of Gressier, home to Bellevue Mountain, which she would eventually discover was an infamous cite for voodoo (or vaudou) rituals (the Afro-Haitian religion that blends Roman Catholicism and spirit worship).

While seeking respite from the sun in the shade of a tamarind tree on the mountain, Boudreaux couldn’t help but wonder about the hunger, sickness, and trauma she had seen among the people. She thought about the “children carrying heavy jugs of water on their heads” which she had watched walking in the hot sun on Bellevue Mountain’s winding path.

“Someone needs to come here,” she thought to herself at the time.

As she soon found out, that “someone” would be her.

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SOURCE: The Christian Post
Nicola Menzie