These Heart-wrenching Photos Show What Life After Hurricane Matthew is Like For the People of Haiti

Marc Arthur Saint Fleur, 41, lies on a mattress that is drying in the sun on his roof in Port-Salut. (Sarah L. Voisin/The Washington Post)
Marc Arthur Saint Fleur, 41, lies on a mattress that is drying in the sun on his roof in Port-Salut. (Sarah L. Voisin/The Washington Post)

One early morning in late October, Bellande Lubin washed her shoes in a river near her home town of Les Cayes, Haiti. She was wearing her favorite pastel pink dress, given to her by her mother. The river, used by the community for bathing, washing clothes and as a latrine, was flooded a month earlier by Hurricane Matthew. Lubin’s in the fifth grade but can’t return to school because it’s being used as a shelter by some of the tens of thousands who lost their homes to the storm.

Matthew has left 800,000 Haitians in desperate need of food. Along the roads, starving children beg for something to eat. Homeless families sleep under trees. Emergency help is arriving, but there is not enough of it. The United Nations has raised just a third of the $120 million needed to cope with the emergency. Storm-hit areas have reported around 3,500 suspected cholera cases. The death toll stands at 546, but local officials have reported twice that many killed.

Washington Post photographer Sarah Voisin visited the country in late October. Here’s a look at what life is like a month after the devastation of Matthew.

At a hurricane-damaged dock in Les Cayes, Haiti, workers leave to unload cargo ships as the sun rises. On the right is a ship containing food and other donated aid supplies waiting to be unloaded. (Sarah L. Voisin/The Washington Post)
At a hurricane-damaged dock in Les Cayes, Haiti, workers leave to unload cargo ships as the sun rises. On the right is a ship containing food and other donated aid supplies waiting to be unloaded. (Sarah L. Voisin/The Washington Post)
Bellande Lubin, 10, washes her shoes in a river in Les Cayes that flooded during the hurricane. She’s in fifth grade but can’t return to school because the building is being used as a shelter for people who lost their homes. (Sarah L. Voisin/The Washington Post)
Bellande Lubin, 10, washes her shoes in a river in Les Cayes that flooded during the hurricane. She’s in fifth grade but can’t return to school because the building is being used as a shelter for people who lost their homes. (Sarah L. Voisin/The Washington Post)
As the sun rises on the badly hit town of Jeremie, young men stand amid rubble that was once seaside homes. (Sarah L. Voisin/The Washington Post)
As the sun rises on the badly hit town of Jeremie, young men stand amid rubble that was once seaside homes. (Sarah L. Voisin/The Washington Post)
Merline Charles, 21, center, sits on a concrete slab that once was her home. She is with her son, Sander Dore, 1, and her daughter, Widlove Adonia, 4. (Sarah L. Voisin/The Washington Post)
Merline Charles, 21, center, sits on a concrete slab that once was her home. She is with her son, Sander Dore, 1, and her daughter, Widlove Adonia, 4. (Sarah L. Voisin/The Washington Post)
A police escort follows a convoy through the town of Carrefour Charles, where the day before, a truck carrying beans was attacked. Small towns on the way to Jeremie are starving and resentful to see many aid convoys pass by. (Sarah L. Voisin/The Washington Post)
A police escort follows a convoy through the town of Carrefour Charles, where the day before, a truck carrying beans was attacked. Small towns on the way to Jeremie are starving and resentful to see many aid convoys pass by. (Sarah L. Voisin/The Washington Post)
As the sun set in the town of Fondtoutanu, which translates to “Left with Nothing,” residents of Dumoi ran down the mountainside to pick up sacks of rice, beans and dried herring. There were 412 bags, almost enough for everyone. They were desperate to get some supplies as many had not eaten in days. (Sarah L. Voisin/The Washington Post)
As the sun set in the town of Fondtoutanu, which translates to “Left with Nothing,” residents of Dumoi ran down the mountainside to pick up sacks of rice, beans and dried herring. There were 412 bags, almost enough for everyone. They were desperate to get some supplies as many had not eaten in days. (Sarah L. Voisin/The Washington Post)

Click here to see more.

SOURCE: The Washington Post – Photos By Sarah L. Voisin. Writer Nick Kirkpatrick